University of Bath

University of Bath Press Release
Monday 12 November 2007

 

Link to original article: http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/2007/11/12/roaccutaneserotonin.html

Research suggests mechanism for acne drug’s link to depression

Dr. Sarah BailyNew research has found that a drug used to treat severe forms of acne reduces the availability of the chemical serotonin, low levels of which have been linked to aggression and clinical depression.

In a study published in the journal Experimental Biology and Medicine, scientists reveal a potential mechanism that might link the drug Roaccutane (Accutane in the US) to reported cases of depression in some patients taking the medication.

The researchers had previously reported that the drug caused depressive behaviour in mice but, until now, the mechanism by which this might happen was unknown.

Using cells cultured in a laboratory, scientists from the University of Bath (UK) and University of Texas at Austin (USA) were able to monitor the effect of the drug on the chemistry of the cells that produce serotonin.

They found that the cells significantly increased production of proteins and cell metabolites that are known to reduce the availability of serotonin.

This, says scientists, could disrupt the process by which serotonin relays signals between neurons in the brain and may be the cause of depression-related behaviour.

“Serotonin is an important chemical that relays signals from nerve cells to other cells in the body,” said Dr Sarah Bailey from the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology at the University of Bath.

“In the brain it is thought to play an important role in the regulation of a range of behaviours, such as aggression, anger and sleep.

“Low levels of serotonin have been linked to depression, as well as bipolar and anxiety disorders.

“Many medications aimed at treating depression seek to increase levels of serotonin to help overcome these problems.

“Our findings suggest that Roaccutane might disrupt the way serotonin is produced and made available to the cells.

“This could result in problems associated with low levels of serotonin, which might include depression.

“We are currently looking into this mechanism in more detail.”

The research is funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institutes of Health and the University of Texas at Austin.

For further information, please contact Andrew McLaughlin in the University of Bath Press Office on + 44 (0)1225 386 883 or +44 (0)7966 341 357.

Notes
The University of Bath is one of the UK’s leading universities, with an international reputation for quality research and teaching. In 15 subject areas the University of Bath is rated in the top ten in the country. View a full list of the University’s press releases: http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/releases/

Useful links

Researchers establish scientific link between acne treatment and depression – 18 September 2006
http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/2006/9/18/acne-mice180906.html

Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, University of Bath
http://www.bath.ac.uk/pharmacy

Department of Human Ecology, University of Texas
http://www.he.utexas.edu/ntr/lane.php